Human Error in takeoff speed calculation – Boeing

January 30th, 2007

The following post abbreviates and article by
FRANK SANTONI, 777 CHIEF PROJECT PILOT, ENGINEERING FLIGHT TEST, BOEING COMMERCIAL AIRPLANES GROUP and JIM TERHUNE, LEAD ENGINEER, ENGINEERING FLIGHT TEST, BOEING COMMERCIAL AIRPLANES GROUP, regarding possible human errors takeoff speed calculation.

Flight crews consider many factors when determining correct takeoff reference speeds, or V speeds, for a particular airplane on a particular runway. These include gross weight (GW); center of gravity; flap position; engine thrust level; bleed air configuration; pressure altitude; outside air temperature; wind; runway length, slope, and surface conditions; clearway; stopway; obstacles; and status of any minimum equipment list (MEL) items such as inoperative brakes, spoilers, or thrust reversers. GW itself encompasses numerous components, most of which change for each flight. The result is many opportunities for human error during calculation of V speeds, even when the process is highly automated. Operators have addressed this situation through training and by devising reliable processes for flight crews and dispatchers to follow. However, despite these preparations, occasionally an error occurs that is significant enough to cause tail strike or noticeably degraded performance during takeoff and initial climb. Operators may considerably reduce their exposure to such incidents by slightly adjusting their process for determining takeoff reference speeds, making minor revisions to their associated training, and understanding the information available on the following subjects:
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Cessna Training Manuals

RTO – by Boeing

January 30th, 2007

ROBERT A. MACKINNON
CAPTAIN, BOEING 747
EVERGREEN INTERNATIONAL AIRLINES

BACKGROUND

The RTO maneuver has been a fact of a pilot’s life since the beginning of aviation. Each takeoff includes the possibility of an RTO and a subsequent series of problems resulting from the actions taken during the reject. Historically, the RTO maneuver occurs approximately once each 3,000 takeoffs. Because the industry now acknowledges that many RTOs are not reported, however, the actual number may be estimated at 1 in 2,000 takeoffs. For example, an unreported RTO may occur when a takeoff is stopped very early in the takeoff roll because the flight crew hears a takeoff warning horn, stops to reset trim, then taxis back to the runway and continues takeoff.
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Becoming a Pilot

January 30th, 2007

Becoming a Pilot

by: steven of askcybersteve.com
edited: by D Bruckert

So you want to become an airline pilot?

Like many before, you have dreamed of climbing into your shiny Boeing 747 Jumbo and flying the world all from the relative comforts of your cockpit. You have also likely dreamed of exotic locales and attractive flight attendants. If this forms part of your dream of becoming a commercial pilot you may be severely disappointed.

Due to the recent shake up in the airline industry the golden age of senior captains earning 200k plus per year and working 12 days per month have practically disappeared. The abhorrent reality is that now most Captains earn in the sub 100k range and are working and flying more duty hours than ever before. They also live on par poverty wages accumulating the appropriate experience level to even reach that lofty point of their career. The unfortunate truth is the path to the becoming a professional pilot is now a rough one.

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Yep they are old, but really you dont stop laughing.

January 23rd, 2007

Some pilot jokes, which might be so old they are getting a bit corny now but…well its always fun to laugh at pilot’s:

How do you know a pilot has walked in the room?
-He’ll tell you.

What is the difference between God and a pilot?
God doesnt think he is a pilot.

Pilots Age 60 Rule – Where is It Now ? FAA viewpoint

January 22nd, 2007

Probably one of the most contentious issues of recent times in the aviation community is the proposed changes to the age 60 rule. As most of the readers will be aware, age 60 is a mandatory retirement age for pilots involved in the part 121 airline environment. Representations and pressure groups from both ends of the age spectrum have recently been engaged in open warfare to influence the change in legislation to their specific sides benefit.
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Testing Attitudes

January 13th, 2007

A conversation recently in the cockpit regarding training philosophy went something like this:
“The airline fails people on sim checks quite regularly, however they dont see it as negative or punitive, purely an indication that further training is required”. The senior Captain, who was jump-seating was from another airline, and went on to say, “The problem only comes in when people become arrogant.”
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Top funnies from the year’s non-fatals

January 5th, 2007

STUPID PILOT TRICKS

Lock your seats, stow your guns, and leave the duct tape for patching your upholstery. It’s time to laugh at how the other half flies.

from IFR magazine by Jane Garvey

As you read this, chestnuts are roasting on an open fire and it’s time once again to do the same to a few of our fellow aviators. If you’ve been with us a while, you know the drill but for the new kids in the class, each year we offer up the bent and bizarre from a year’s worth of NTSB accident summaries, all non-fatal.
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